Tag Archives: Howard Morphy

Inside and Outside: an essay

Several weeks ago I wrote about a panel discussion at the Toledo Museum of Art in which the topic of restricted knowledge in Aboriginal painting—what Stephen Gilchrist referred to as “registers of knowledge”—created a degree of consternation among some members … Continue reading

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The Djang’kawu Come to America

Last weekend we were back at Dartmouth College to hear Howard Morphy deliver the Montgomery Endowment Lecture as part of the fellowship that has him and his wife, Frances, in residence at the College this semester.  He chose as his … Continue reading

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Huxley Medal Awarded to Howard Morphy

I heard some fantastic news this week. Professor Howard Morphy of the ANU College of Arts and Social Sciences has been named as the 2013 Huxley Memorial Medallist by the Royal Anthropological Institute. The international award is the highest honour … Continue reading

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Canberra! Sydney!

Canberra was awesome.  I have to admit I never thought I’d say that. I have to give the credit to our hosts all along the way.  Kristian Pithie warmly welcomed us to the Chapman Gallery with its lovely show of … Continue reading

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Side by Side, Yolngu and Balanda

In his article, “Mutual Conversion?: The Methodist Church and the Yolngu,with particular reference to Yirrkala” (Humanities Research, vol. XII, no. 1, 2005, pp. 41-53), Howard Morphy essays a preliminary history of the Methodist Overseas Mission in Arnhem Land.  Admitting that … Continue reading

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Master of Arts: New Work from Howard Morphy

Two weeks ago in Charlottesville I had the great good fortune to receive an advance copy of Howard Morphy’s latest monograph, Becoming Art: exploring cross-cultural categories (Berg, 2007). This new book is like a river stone, its arguments polished by years of … Continue reading

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Sacred or Profane? The Australian Government’s Intervention in Aboriginal Communities

The headline for this post derives from the title of a panel discussion that took place on December 2, sponsored by the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at the University of Virginia. Organized by curator Margo Smith, the panel was designed to raise … Continue reading

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